Mueller Sports Medicine Media Room

Introducing Text Tape™

Posted by Cotton Fitzgerald

Mar 24, 2016 9:16:48 AM


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The mobile phone has dramatically and irreversibly altered how we function in society. Apps and texting have made our lives richer and more fulfilling. Family and friends, work or play are literally at your finger tips 24/7.


 

The mobile phone has dramatically and irreversibly altered how we function in society. Apps and texting have made our lives richer and more fulfilling. Family and friends, work or play are literally at your finger tips 24/7.

Unfortunately, the convenience offered by mobile phones comes at a price — Text-Worn Index and Thumb (TWIT). TWIT is a repetitive stress injury resulting from prolonged tapping, scrolling, and texting on a mobile device. It affects not only your index finger and thumb, but also your wrist.

These types of repetitive stress injuries are not limited to adults, either. Doctors are diagnosing more and more children with repetitive stress injuries related to their use of computers, mobile phones and gaming devices. Younger children are even more vulnerable to injury due to the fact they strain their fingers just to use keyboards and buttons designed for adults.

Text Tape

According to Dr. Hans Mutumbo, a Sports Medicine doctor with the Institute for Electronic Health and Safety,

"The hours of enjoyment these children experience from using their mobile devices and games is hardly worth the adult-type injuries they are inflicting upon themselves." 

Dr. Mutumbo recommends that adults limit the time children spend with an electronic device to five minutes at a time for a total of not more than 30 minutes per day.

He also recommends that adults set a good example (and help prevent their own repetitive stress injuries) by limiting their use of mobile devices to two hours per day in ten minute increments. Texts should be limited to 60-65 characters and no more than two texts per hour. If your hand starts to hurt while texting, Dr. Mutumbo suggests you stop and call that person instead. Don't resume texting until your ear begins to hurt or goes numb.

Ergonomic Times recommends the following exercises to help strengthen your thumbs and fingers:
• Tap your thumb against each finger of the same hand. Repeat 5 times.
• Grab your thumb with your other hand and give it a firm tug. Repeat 5 times or until your thumb feels like it's coming loose.
• Make Pat-A-Cake like motions, alternating with the palm and back of your hand. It's very important that you keep accurate time with the song.
• Stretch a rubber band around both thumbs and try your hardest to break it. Wear safety glasses.
• Shake hands with yourself over your head and again at ankle level. Repeat each step 3 times. While doing this exercise, you can congratulate yourself on your proactive approach to thumb and forefinger health.

If after a week of doing these exercises pain persists, try using an ice pack on your hand and wrist. Wrap the ice pack in a thin cloth or paper towel and use it for 10 minutes on, 10 minutes off. A bag of frozen peas works well as a substitute ice bag, if necessary.

Of course, you'll have to put your phone down while doing these exercises. However, it's a small price to pay for the security of knowing that you're doing your best to protect your most valuable texting instrument!

Now there is some good news on the texting horizon. A new kinesiology taping product can help prevent TWIT. It's called Text Tape™ and it was developed by the experts at Mueller Sports Medicine as a way to prevent foolish mobile phone injuries. Contact us for more information.Dr. Hans Mutumbo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: Tape, texting